For Children

While there is no exact age for children to begin orthodontic treatment, the American Association of Orthodontists recommends visiting the orthodontist around seven years of age. Early treatment allows your orthodontist to correct and guide your child’s jaw, create more space for crowded teeth, avoid the need for extractions later in life, and correct thumb sucking and minor speech problems. There are a few things to watch for that may mean your child needs to see an orthodontist, such as crowded or misplaced teeth, deep bite, under bite, difficulty chewing or biting, mouth breathing, or thumb sucking.

For Teens

Braces are no longer as scary as many teens may think. In fact, braces today come in a variety of styles, materials, and colors, making life with braces much easier, more comfortable, and even more stylish than in the past. There are several treatment options to choose from, including traditional metal, ceramic clear braces, and invisible braces.  Regardless of the type of braces you choose, it is important to understand life with braces and avoid sticky, hard, or chewy foods, as these may damage your braces and prolong your treatment time.

For Adults

Orthodontic treatment is no longer just for teens! A large percentage of our patients are adults, and they agree that it’s never too late to improve their greatest asset - their smile. In fact, according to the American Association of Orthodontists, one in five orthodontic patients are over the age of 21! Today’s orthodontic treatment options offer several types of braces and appliances that are comfortable, aesthetic, and customized to meet your needs. Remember, a straight smile isn’t just beautiful; it will help you maintain the health of your teeth for life!


From a medical perspective there are many reasons why straighter teeth, which leads to a more functional bite, less stress on muscles and joints and overall better quality of life, can benefit people of all ages.

Dentofacial Orthopedics

With skills in both areas, Dr. Austin can diagnose any misalignments in the teeth and jaw as well as the facial structure, and can devise a treatment plan that integrates both orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic treatments.

Surgical Orthopedics

We consider surgical orthodontic treatment for non-growing adult patients with improper bites and those with facial aesthetic concerns. Jaw growth is usually completed by age 16 for girls and 18 for boys. All growth must be completed before jaw surgery can be performed. However, the pre-surgical tooth movements can begin one to two years prior to these ages.

Craniofacial Orthodontics

Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment

Craniofacial orthodontics is the sub-specialty of orthodontics that focuses on the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary treatment of patients with birth defects such as cleft lip and palate. These conditions often require coordinated surgical and medical interventions or extraordinary behavioral management to make orthodontic treatment practical and effective. Braces treatments for cleft lip and palate patients tends to be more complex, takes more time and clinical resources, and requires working with multiple dental, surgical, and medical providers to get the best results. Current practice standards call for a coordinated plan of care between the fellowship-trained craniofacial orthodontists and plastic-craniofacial surgeons — among other specialists — in order to achieve excellent and aesthetic facial results.

TMJ/TMD

Millions of Americans suffer from chronic facial and neck pain as well as severe, recurring headaches. In some cases this pain is due to Temporomandibular Disorder, also known as TMD.

Your temporomandibular joints, or TMJs, connect your lower jawbone to your skull. These joints get a lot of use throughout the day as you speak, chew, swallow, and yawn. Pain in and around these joints can be unpleasant and may even restrict movement.